Woman in her 50s with broken leg left waiting nearly an hour in Llangollen field for an ambulance

Reporter:

Josh Morris

The ambulance service have been criticised after a woman in her 50s with a suspected broken leg was left waiting in a field for nearly an hour.
 
Jessie Bishop was by Fron Castell near Llangollen when she went over on her leg. Local councillor, Cllr Stuart Davies called for an ambulance but was told there wasn’t one immediately available.
 
The Welsh Ambulance Service Trust say they monitored Jessie Bishop’s condition and sent an available vehicle as soon as they could but were limited by a bottle neck at Wrexham Maelor.
 
Cllr Davies said: The general public were supportive for her, getting her blankets and the like but it’s disgusting.
 
“There was an off-duty GP who lives not far away and checked her over, but the problem is, you can the call centre they don’t know where you are.
 
“I said the Fire Service had a first responder, so why not get that out? But they said that decision is above us, it’s taken elsewhere.
 
“The issue is the bed blocking at Wrexham Maelor and the closure of the cottage hospitals. If you break your leg you’ll be left lying for like a dog in the mud because the government doesn’t give a stuff.”
 
The Welsh Ambulance Service Trust recently attended a Denbighshire County Council scrutiny meeting over the issue of long waiting times in for ambulances in Llangollen. This week the service were also criticised after a man with a severed finger was left waiting for an hour before being collected by an ambulance service taxi and taken to hospital.
 
Sonia Thompson, the Welsh Ambulance Service’s Head of Operations for North Wales, said: “We appreciate that this would have been an uncomfortable wait and we apologise for the experience this patient had. We received a call at about 6.05pm on Thursday to reports that a woman had fallen and sustained an injury in Fron Bach, Llangollen, this call was treated as an emergency but was not prioritised as being life threatening .
 
“We sent a crew in an emergency ambulance, who arrived at the scene within 53 minutes, and during this period the patient’s condition was being monitored by one of the clinicians in our Clinical Contact Centre.
 
“At the time of the call all of our available ambulances were either committed to other patients in the community or handing over at hospitals, including Wrexham Maelor Hospital where we experienced handover delays on Thursday. Should the patient wish to discuss her care further with us we are of course happy to do this. In the meantime we would like to send her our best wishes for her recovery.”

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